Learning how to be happy by volunteering and picking up trash in the woods

Rate this article and enter to win

Finding happiness can seem like a complex, mystical equation. But increasing your happiness is shockingly simple. Positive psychology researchers who study human behaviour have found that happiness comes down to the little things: human connection, spending time outside, smiling (even if you have to fake it at first).

“Aside from just being happy, which obviously feels really good, happiness is connected to all the other things that most students want in life,” says Dr. Laurie Santos, a psychology professor at Yale University. “Your happiness in college [or university] predicts how likely you are to get a job callback; your happiness as a young person predicts your salary at age 30; happy people get better grades; and happy people are healthier—they are less likely to get a cold when exposed to a virus, and more likely to live longer.”

Yeah, happiness is pretty important.

Helping your way to happiness

One of the most powerful and well-researched ways to boost happiness is to help others. Countless studies have shown that giving back (think donating to charity or even helping a friend move into their new apartment) makes people feel good. One 2013 review of 20 years of research on volunteering found that giving back can be a powerful mental health booster, reducing depression and increasing life satisfaction.

 happy guy volunteering | how to be happyBut research also shows that how you help matters. In her TED Talk, social psychologist Dr. Elizabeth Dunn breaks down a familiar scenario: She knew that giving to others was supposed to increase happiness—her own research proved it—but she realized that she wasn’t always following her own rules. She didn’t donate that much money to charity, and when she did, she didn’t really feel that much happier. “I started to wonder if maybe there was something wrong with my research or something wrong with me,” she said.

This kind of disconnect is common: While many students talked about the benefits of volunteering in a recent Student Health 101 survey, only 40 percent of Canadian students who responded said they volunteered or donated more than once or twice a year.

Giving back can make you happier—but it matters how you do it

“Back in my lab, we’d seen the benefits of giving [to others] spike when people felt a real sense of connection with those they were helping and could easily envision the difference they were making in those individuals’ lives,” Dr. Dunn said. In other words, it’s not the simple act of giving that makes you feel good; it’s understanding how your charitable activities make a tangible impact that really turns up your happiness levels. “I think the benefits of offering time or money to charities/causes is the impact it can have. Not only on the organization but on our own lives. I think it’s important to find opportunities within areas that you really care about,” says Courtni S., a second-year graduate student at the University of New Brunswick.

Dr. Dunn gave an example in her TED Talk: In one experiment, she and her fellow researchers gave participants the choice to donate money to UNICEF or Spread the Net—two charities focused on promoting children’s health. The difference? While UNICEF is a massive global fund with many functions, Spread the Net focuses on one simple, impactful task: For every $10 donated, they send a mosquito net to those in need to help prevent malaria in developing countries. “We saw that the more money people gave to Spread the Net, the happier they reported feeling afterward,” Dr. Dunn explained. “This suggests that just giving money to a worthwhile charity isn’t always enough. You need to be able to envision how exactly your dollars are going to make a difference.”

What this tells us about happiness

Dr. Dunn’s findings have big implications.

1. Helping others makes us happy

“Study after study shows that happiness comes from being other-oriented—feeling connected to others and doing nice things for those around us,” says Dr. Santos.

2. Feeling connected to others is powerful

“A second thing [Dr. Dunn’s] work shows is the power of connection,” says Dr. Santos. “What we get out of charity is a feeling of connection to other people. And feeling socially connected is one of the biggest predictors of happiness.”

Get happier by getting involved: Check out these charity organizations

Volunteer canada
Volunteer Canada

Volunteer Canada helps connect people with volunteer opportunities. They provide leadership on issues related to volunteering and citizen engagement. The cool part? You can go straight to their opportunities platform that’s specifically for people ages 15-30 to find an opportunity in your area that suits you.


Your school

You may not have to go far to find a list of volunteer opportunities available at your school or in your community. You may be able to tutor a struggling student, help some animals at the local shelter, or even stock shelves at the food bank. Check out your career counselling centre to see what might be available right in your own backyard.

Nature conservancy canadaNature Conservancy Canada

If anything will really help you feel the tangible impact of your efforts, it’s getting your hands dirty. Find an event where you can help nature by cleaning up beaches, counting butterflies or birds, or removing invasive species with Nature Conservancy Canada.

Special olympics canada foundation
Special Olympics Canada

Want to help spread the joy of sport? Special Olympics Canada has chapters across the country with opportunities in sports clubs, competitions, and fundraising. Find the chapter near you and get involved.

Canada Helps.org
Canada Helps

Short on time? Perhaps finding a charity that aligns with you and sending them a donation is what you’d prefer. Canada Helps allows you to search over 20,000 charities and send them a donation. Better yet, you can give the gift of giving by sending someone else a charitable donation and letting them choose which charity to give the money to.

Mount Royal Resources
GET HELP OR FIND OUT MORE

Individuals under the age of 13 may not enter or submit information to this giveaway.
Your data will never be shared or sold to outside parties. View our Privacy Policy.

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us More
How can we get more people to read ?
? First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

I do not reside in Nevada Or Hawaii:

Want to increase your chance to win?

Refer up to 5 of your friends and when each visits , you will receive an additional entry into the weekly drawing.

Please note: Unless your friend chooses to opt-in, they will never receive another email from after the initial referral email.

Friends Email 1:

Friends Email 2:

Friends Email 3:

Friends Email 4:

Friends Email 5:

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?
?First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

I do not reside in Nevada Or Hawaii:

Want to increase your chance to win?

Refer up to 5 of your friends and when each visits , you will receive an additional entry into the weekly drawing.

Please note: Unless your friend chooses to opt-in, they will never receive another email from after the initial referral email.

Friends Email 1:

Friends Email 2:

Friends Email 3:

Friends Email 4:

Friends Email 5:



HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?

?First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

I do not reside in Nevada Or Hawaii:

Want to increase your chance to win?

Refer up to 5 of your friends and when each visits , you will receive an additional entry into the weekly drawing.

Please note: Unless your friend chooses to opt-in, they will never receive another email from after the initial referral email.

Friends Email 1:

Friends Email 2:

Friends Email 3:

Friends Email 4:

Friends Email 5:



Article sources

Laurie Santos, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Action for Happiness. (n.d.). Do things for others. Retrieved from https://www.actionforhappiness.org/10-keys-to-happier-living/do-things-for-others/details

Dunn, E. (2019, April). Helping others makes us happier—but it matters how we do it [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_dunn_helping_others_makes_us_happier_but_it_matters_how_we_do_it#t-39445

Dunn, E. W., Aknin, L. B., & Norton, M. I. (2008, March). Spending money on others promotes happiness. Science, 319(5870), 1687–1688. doi: 10.1126/science.1150952

Jenkinson, C. E., Dickens, A. P., Jones, K., Thompson-Coon, J., et al. (2013, August 23). Is volunteering a public health intervention? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the health and survival of volunteers. BMC Public Health, 13(773). doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-773

Student Health 101 survey, August 2019.

Vantage Mobility. (2017, April 26). The 6 best websites and apps for volunteering. Retrieved from https://www.vantagemobility.com/blog/best-volunteer-websites-apps